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Hacked with a machete by her husband, young woman gets justice with the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) support

UNFPA - East and Southern Africa
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Anna Salima, 24, has painful memories of her two marriages. With her first marriage, it took her just a week to realize she had married the wrong man. Yet she stayed for five years, enduring verbal and physical abuse, as she hoped her husband would change.

After their first child was born, she couldn’t stand it any longer and returned to her parents’ home. She was bitter from the abuse she suffered and vowed never to marry again. It wasn’t long before another man began promising her a marriage made in heaven.

“He seemed to be somewhat different from my first husband,” she says. “He was so kind and caring, I thought of giving him a chance.”

Within a few months of meeting, the two became engaged. A traditional wedding ceremony followed and Ms. Salima forgot about the pains of her first marriage. But not for long. 

A few months after they married, her new husband questioned why she wasn’t yet pregnant.

“I pointed out that it may be his problem, as I already had children from my first marriage,” she says. “This didn’t go down well with him. He became moody and started drinking excessively.”

His heavy drinking foreshadowed the horrors Ms. Salima was to face.

“This one day, he came back home totally drunk. We had a minor disagreement and he pulled a knife, threatening to stab me,” she says. “Luckily, my sister was around and she intervened.”

Things improved a little when Ms. Salima became pregnant. After two years, she delivered a second child in her new marriage, yet by then her husband was drinking regularly and heavily.

When she returned from the field one day, she found her husband sitting on the veranda in a sour mood. At times like this, she made a point of avoiding confrontations with him.

“He asked for food and I prepared a meal for him,” she recollects. “After that, he said he wanted to sleep with me but I pleaded that I was tired. He tried to drag me into the house and I refused.”

In anger, her husband stormed off and returned with a machete. He struck her arm twice with the powerful blade before she managed to flee, with him in pursuit.

“I was bleeding heavily,” she says. “The only place I knew I would be safe was at the Community Victim Support Unit (CVSU). I ran as fast as I could, and he eventually became tired and stopped pursuing me.”

At the CVSU, she explained what had happened to her. Because she was badly injured and had no means to access essential services, the CVSU contacted the Community Fund Committee (CFC), which agreed to release funds for her to get the urgent medical treatment she needed. The CFC forms part of the European Union-funded Spotlight Initiative, which supports GBV survivors with resources to access health services and the judicial system.

“At the health centre, they said my wound was severe and I was referred to Nkhata Bay district hospital,” she says. Because of the extent of her injuries from the machete, she came close to losing her hand. “They put plaster of paris on my arm and told me to come back for a check-up in two months.”

Justice at last, with UNFPA and Spotlight Initiative support
The CVSU also alerted the community policing forum, and members were sent to her house to apprehend her husband. When her case reached the courts, the CFC mobilized further funds for Ms. Salima to attend her husband’s hearing.

“I am thankful for the support,” she says. “Without it, I couldn’t have made it to the court sessions.”

Her husband was convicted and is serving six years in prison. However, she feels the sentence should have been stiffer.

“I wanted him to get 30 years or more,” she says. “I am lucky that he injured my arm as he was aiming for the head. Such people should be put away for life as they are not only a risk to women, but the community at large.”

Nkhata Bay, where Ms. Salima hails from, has one of the highest number of cases of gender-based violence (GBV) in the country. Recent statistics for the district show that out of every 100 women and girls who experienced GBV, 11 of them experienced physical violence.

UNFPA has supported 18 communities at Traditional Authority or Sub-Traditional Authority level in Nkhata Bay with community funding. As at April 2022, this funding had supported 823 women and girls who experienced and survived GBV in the district.

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of UNFPA – East and Southern Africa.

This Press Release has been issued by APO. The content is not monitored by the editorial team of African Business and not of the content has been checked or validated by our editorial teams, proof readers or fact checkers. The issuer is solely responsible for the content of this announcement.

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Ruto: We will Pursue Data Protection Regime that is Pro-Transformation

President of the Republic of Kenya

President William Ruto has said the Government will pursue a data protection regime that serves public interest.

He said this will be achieved by ensuring that there is sufficient information for effective and efficient delivery of services.

However, this will be pursued without compromising private data.

“But we must also ensure that criminals do not hide under data protection or exploit it to perpetuate crime,” he said.

The President was speaking on Friday at the Kenyatta International Convention Centre during the observation of the International Data Privacy Day.

He also officially launched the Data Protection Registration system. For Kenya to realise the maximum potential of the Digital Superhighway, he explained, we must have a clear data management plan that is promotive of our agenda for the digital economy. The government, he added, will partner with stakeholders to expand the space for creativity and innovation.“It is our intention to ensure that Kenya reaps its overdue dividends from the heavy investment in ICT infrastructure made over the last two decades.”The President noted that over the next five years, the Government will construct more than 100,000 kilometres of national fibre-optic network.

This, he added, will help achieve universal broadband connectivity in the country to enhance Government service delivery.“We are developing the Digital Master Plan and establishing a regional hub to promote the large-scale development of software for export.”He promised to support the Office of the Data Protection Commissioner to acquire the requisite capacity to effectively perform its functions.

“Our commitment to competitiveness, innovation, digitisation, automation and the digital economy requires a credible and legitimate facilitator to anchor investor confidence.”

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of President of the Republic of Kenya.

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United Kingdom (UK): Discrimination against people of African descent is structural, institutional and systemic, say United Nations (UN) experts

Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR)
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Racism in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is structural, institutional and systemic, UN experts* said today, warning that people of African descent in the country continue to encounter racial discrimination and erosion of their fundamental rights.

“We have serious concerns about impunity and the failure to address racial disparities in the criminal justice system, deaths in police custody, ‘joint enterprise’ convictions and the dehumanising nature of the stop and (strip) search,” the UN Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent said in a statement at the end of an official visit to the UK.

The experts documented the “trauma” felt by people of African descent who were suffering racial discrimination and injustice in the UK. “A woman of African descent we met during our visit lamented, ‘will this ever end?’” they said.

A decade of austerity measures in the UK had exacerbated racism, racial discrimination and other intolerance people of African descent encounter, which had an adverse impact on their fundamental rights, the experts observed.

“From the perspective of people of African descent, racism in the UK is structural, institutional and systemic,” the experts said. 

The experts pointed out that for people of African descent, their experience with state and public institutions, the private sector and society was that it perpetuated racial hierarchies. “Racialised acts targeting people of African descent have remained steadfast, and the experience is similar across different parts of the UK,” the experts said. “They are victimised and have no assurance of effective redress from authorities or the justice system,” they said.

Welcoming emerging efforts towards reparation for the legacies of the trade and trafficking in enslaved Africans, the Working Group encouraged all stakeholders including the government to do more to ensure the rehabilitation, restoration, and reconciliation of the state with its people.

“Streamlining accessible, independent and effective complaint mechanisms to address racism, ensuring police accountability, fair trial guarantees for all persons, and redress to all persons affected by the Windrush scandal are imperative” said Catherine S. Namakula, Chair of the Working Group. “Austerity to the peril of fundamental rights is a costly undertaking for the UK,” she said.

The Working Group, which also included human rights experts Barbara Reynolds and Dominique Day, visited London, Birmingham, Manchester and Bristol.

The experts will present a report with their findings and recommendations to the UN Human Rights Council in September 2023.

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR).

This Press Release has been issued by APO. The content is not monitored by the editorial team of African Business and not of the content has been checked or validated by our editorial teams, proof readers or fact checkers. The issuer is solely responsible for the content of this announcement.

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Seychelles: Appointment of the Chief Executive Officer of the Seychelles National Youth Council

State House – Office of the President of the Republic of Seychelles
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The Office of the President has today announced the appointment of Mr. Albert Duncan as the new Chief Executive Officer of the Seychelles National Youth Council (SNYC) effective from the 1st of February, 2023.

Mr. Duncan has a Bachelor’s Degree in Social Policy from the University of Manchester in the United Kingdom.

Mr. Duncan has 18 years of experience working in both the private and public sectors.

Prior to his appointment as Chief Executive Officer, Mr. Duncan was the Head of Sales and Marketing at the Seychelles Trading Company (STC).

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of State House – Office of the President of the Republic of Seychelles.

This Press Release has been issued by APO. The content is not monitored by the editorial team of African Business and not of the content has been checked or validated by our editorial teams, proof readers or fact checkers. The issuer is solely responsible for the content of this announcement.

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Malawi and European Union hold Political Dialogue

Delegation of the European Union to the Republic of Malawi

On 26th January 2023, the Republic of Malawi and the European Union (EU) held their bi-annual Political Dialogue meeting on a range of issues of mutual interest. The discussion, which was hosted by the European Union, was characterised by mutual trust between the parties and was conducted in an open and constructive manner.

The Government of Malawi Delegation was led by Honourable Nancy Tembo, M.P., Minister of Foreign Affairs, who was accompanied by Honourable Titus Mvalo, Minister of Justice, Honourable Eisenhower Nduwa Mkaka, M.P., Minister of Natural Resources and Climate Change, Honourable Mark Katsonga Phiri, M.P., Minister of Trade and Industry,  Honourable Nancy Chaola Mdooko, Deputy Minister of Transport, Dr Thomas Munthali, Director General of the National Planning Commission and senior government officials from various ministries, departments and agencies.

The Delegation on the side of the European Union was led by the EU Ambassador to Malawi, Mr Rune Skinnebach, who was accompanied by His Excellency Ralph Timmermann, Ambassador of Germany, His Excellency Seamus O’Grady, Ambassador of Ireland, Her Excellency Saana Halinen, Ambassador of Finland, Her Excellency Margret Verwijk, Ambassador of the Netherlands, His Excellency  Miguel Calheiros Veloz, Ambassador of Portugal,  Ms Fanny Heylen, Headof Cooperation for Belgium, Mr Václav Kuželka, Deputy Ambassador of the Czech Republic, Mr Diego Calatayud, Deputy Ambassador of Spain, Mr Martin Jörnrud, Deputy Ambassador of Sweden, and officials from the European Union Delegation in Malawi.

The Political Dialogue addressed a series of topics relating to:

  • Common values and positions on geo-political developments focusing on Russian aggression in Ukraine and regional developments, and a shared assessment of outcomes of COP27;
  • Democracy and human rights with a focus on access to justice and anti-corruption efforts and achievements;
  • Political and economic situation, including prospects for an IMF Extended Credit Facility;
  • Reforms to the business climate and investment environment, agriculture, exports, cross-border trade under AfCFTA, and reinforcing synergies with the EU’s Global Gateway;
  • The two sides, lastly, discussed partnership for development focusing on EU exploration of budget support.

Speaking at the meeting, Honourable Nancy Tembo, observed that the discussion on the possibility of resuming direct budgetary support, underline the recognition and appreciation by the EU on the progress which the government is making in the field of governance and public financial management among others.”

She further appealed to the EU to enable Malawi benefit from its Global Gateway investment package, particularly in respect of regional transport corridors and other infrastructural projects and digitization in order to re-inforce synergies of cross border trade.”

The EU Ambassador, His Excellency Rune Skinnebach, stated: “I am heartened by the shared perspectives on many aspects covered by the dialogue, and I am confident that the strong and long-lasting partnership between Malawi and the European Union constitutes a solid foundation for pursuing our shared strategic priorities.

Furthermore, Ambassador Skinnebach was thrilled to note the Government’s determination in the fight against corruption, and the progress in many fields touched upon during the dialogue. Furthermore he expressed encouragement with regards to potentially providing budget support through the EU Multi-annual Indicative Programme (MIP) for Malawi for the period 2021-27 if the outstanding macro-economic and public finance management issues are addressed.

Both parties re-affirmed their commitment to holding a regular high-level political dialogue between them, and to the promotion of democracy, the rule of law, good governance and human rights.

The dialogue was followed in the afternoon by an audience with H.E. Dr Lazarus McCarthy Chakwera, President of the Republic of Malawi.

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of Delegation of the European Union to the Republic of Malawi.

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Victim Empowerment Programme gets funding boost

Republic Of South Africa: Western Cape Provincial Government
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The Western Cape Department of Social Development allocated R62 866 000 to its Victim Empowerment Programme (VEP) in the 2022/2023 financial year, a significant increase from the R45 million that was allocated in 2019. The VEP focuses on providing support to victims of gender-based violence (GBV).

The Department has now allocated a further R1.6 million in addition to the R62 866 000 already allocated to the programme for 2022/2023.

These funds will help aid operational costs at Non-Profit Organisations (NPOs) across the province that assist GBV victims and survivors.

A breakdown of the funding allocation:

  • R47 000 has been allocated to each of the 20 shelters in the province that provide safe temporary accommodation to GBV victims and offer a range of psychosocial support services.
  • Over R55 000 has been allocated to the Mosaic Women’s Training Service and Healing Centre based in Wynberg and provides services across Cape Town. The Department of Justice and Constitutional Development identified Strand court as the busiest metro court in terms of the number of protection order applications. There is thus a need to activate court support services for victims to access psychosocial support services, which Mosaic Centre provides. With this funding, two additional social auxiliary work posts can be filled to render court support services.
  • R141 000 has been allocated to Siyabonga Huis van Danksegging in Vredenburg.
  • Over R296 000 has been allocated to Glen Elgin Community Organisation. Currently there is not a shelter for GBV victims in the Overberg region. A suitable site was identified, and the Glen Elgin Community Outreach organisation subsequently submitted a business plan to manage the shelter.
  • Over R217 000 has been allocated to the S Cape in Fish Hoek to increase its available services.

“The work done by our NPO partners in the Victim Empowerment space, despite facing immense challenges like load-shedding and rising operational costs, is phenomenal. We salute all those who provide support to victims and survivors of violence. I do hope the additional funding will offer some respite in this tumultuous economic climate. I once again call on the private sector to come on board and assist NPOs that provide this crucial service,” says MEC of Social Development Sharna Fernandez.

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of Republic Of South Africa: Western Cape Provincial Government.

This Press Release has been issued by APO. The content is not monitored by the editorial team of African Business and not of the content has been checked or validated by our editorial teams, proof readers or fact checkers. The issuer is solely responsible for the content of this announcement.

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Appointment of the Chief Executive Officer of the Seychelles Licensing Authority

State House – Office of the President of the Republic of Seychelles
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The Office of the President has today announced the appointment of Mr. Ronny Antat as the new Chief Executive Officer of the Seychelles Licensing Authority (SLA) effective from the 9th January, 2023.

Mr. Antat has a Master’s Degree in Business Administration from the University of the West of Scotland and a Bachelor’s Degree in Biochemistry and Human Movement Science from the Nelson Mandela University, in South Africa.

Mr. Antat has 12 years of experience working in both the private sector and the public sector.

Prior to his appointment as Chief Executive Officer, Mr. Antat was the Development and Assessment Manager at the Seychelles Fishing Authority.

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of State House – Office of the President of the Republic of Seychelles.

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Ambassador Adler Honors Graduates of United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partnership That Empowers Young Women

U.S. Embassy in South Sudan
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The U.S. Ambassador to South Sudan Michael J. Adler today presented certificates to seven graduates of a U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) activity funded through the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). This program empowers adolescent girls and young women with income-generating skills—and for those selected through a competitive process, a three-month internship at the Radisson Blu Hotel in Juba. This public-private partnership highlights the important role of South Sudan’s private sector in building gender equity and providing life-changing opportunities for young women of diverse backgrounds through professional workforce development.

The USAID Adolescents and Children HIV Incidence Reduction, Empowerment and Virus Elimination (ACHIEVE) project that created this training program is part of the U.S. Government’s contributions to the people of South Sudan under PEPFAR, which marks its 20th anniversary this year. PEPFAR has saved 25 million lives worldwide and achieved a 65 percent reduction in new HIV cases in men and boys aged 15-24 and a 50 percent reduction in new HIV cases among women and girls aged 15-24 since 2010.

This USAID project is focused on preventing HIV infections among women and children in South Sudan. Implemented by Jhpiego—an international, non-profit health organization affiliated with Johns Hopkins University and dedicated to improving the health of women and families—ACHIEVE serves as an umbrella in South Sudan for a complementary PEPFAR initiative—the Determined, Resilient, Empowered, AIDS Free, Mentored and Safe (DREAMS) activity for vulnerable adolescent girls and young women.

ACHIEVE provides comprehensive HIV prevention and case management services for orphans and vulnerable children, adolescent girls, and young women in Juba, and has provided training and services to more than 4,000 adolescent girls and young women so far, including skills training on tailoring, hairdressing, driving a vehicle, and other income-generating activities, including making sandals, fruit juice, and liquid soap. ACHIEVE also helped improve the clinical outcome for orphans and vulnerable children on antiretroviral therapy viral load suppression in Juba, from less than 50 percent when the activity started in April 2020, to about 84 percent at the end of September 2022.

With Radisson Blu Hotel General Manager Dino Urbani, Ambassador Adler presented graduation certificates to seven young women who completed their three-month internship at Radisson Blu Hotel in front desk management, catering, housekeeping, and engineering/plumbing. “May you all have futures of success and happiness,” Ambassador Adler told the young women during a ceremony at Nakasongola Christ Church in Juba. “May South Sudan have a happy future of peace and prosperity.”

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of U.S. Embassy in South Sudan.

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South Africa: Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development announces new outbreak of African Swine Fever (ASF) in Gauteng

Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development: Republic of South Africa
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The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development would like to announce a new outbreak of African Swine Fever (ASF) on a farm in Gauteng Province. 

The farm has been put under quarantine and the Provincial Veterinary Services instituted forward and back-tracing investigations to identify any properties that could have had direct or indirect contact with the affected farm. 

Farms in Gauteng, North West and Free State Provinces have been placed under precautionary quarantine as a result of this. The ASF negative status of these farms will be confirmed before precautionary quarantine can be lifted. The source of the infection on the positive farm has not yet been identified, but it is believed that the infection was already on the farm from mid-December.

Outbreaks of African Swine Fever (ASF) started in the previous ASF free areas of South Africa in 2019 and these outbreaks eventually affected many areas of the country. The spread of the disease seems to have slowed down, with less new properties becoming infected since October 2022. Control measures are based on quarantine and movement controls, with awareness drives to highlight essential biosecurity measures to enable pig owners to prevent infection of their pigs.

This outbreak of ASF on a farm with good biosecurity measures in place again illustrates that the virus is highly contagious.  

All pig farmers and pig keepers are again urged to only buy pigs directly from known healthy herds and to prevent contact between their pigs and other pigs or wildlife. Visitors should be discouraged from coming into the area where pigs are being kept. Anyone who has contact with pigs should wash their hands before and after handling the pigs; and before moving to other farms, one should ensure that they have thoroughly showered and to only use clean clothes, shoes, and equipment.

ASF is a controlled disease in terms of the Animal Diseases Act, 1984 (Act 35 of 1984), which means that all cases or suspicion of ASF must be reported to the state veterinary services. Pig owners are encouraged to be extra vigilant and to report any increased pig deaths or unusual symptoms to the local state veterinary office. All pig owners are also reminded that Section 11 of the Animal Diseases Act makes every animal keeper responsible to prevent the spread of disease from their animals or land to other properties. The importance of biosecurity is again emphasised, both to protect your own animals, and to prevent the inadvertent spread to other pigs. Veterinarians are urged to rule out ASF whenever there is increased mortality on a farm.

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development: Republic of South Africa.

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United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) launches biggest ever international effort to update guidance for censuses

United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE)
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In the largest ever effort of its kind, a multi-year UNECE project has kicked off to produce internationally agreed guidance and advice for conducting the next round of censuses, foreseen around 2030. 

Censuses and the information they provide on populations, their distributions and characteristics and how these change over time, are key to all policymaking and underpin the work of the entire United Nations system. 

All UNECE countries, plus many beyond the region, rely on the Conference of European Statisticians’ Recommendations for Population and Housing Censuses to help them plan and carry out their censuses, ensuring that they are reliable, cost-effective and comparable. The update of these regional recommendations lays the groundwork for a subsequent global revision of the overarching UN Principles and Recommendations for Population and Housing Censuses, which draws heavily on the experiences in the region. 

The cornerstone of informed decision-making 

A census of a country’s population and housing—a full count of everyone who lives there and the homes they live in—is the cornerstone of every country’s statistical system. It provides the baseline for many of the figures we see in the news every day; anything that’s given ‘per capita’ depends on knowing the size of the population. And many social, economic and environmental policies are shaped by information about where people live, how old they are, how many children or older people live in each place, and the income levels in different parts of a country. The information gathered in a census also lays the foundation for the sample surveys, population estimates and projections undertaken by national statistical offices. So important is a census for formulating and monitoring national and international policies, in fact, that it’s enshrined both in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development (target 17.19 is assessed by counting countries that have conducted at least one census in the past ten years) and in a Resolution of the United Nations Economic and Social Council that urges every country to conduct a census during the period 2015 to 2024 – known as ‘the 2020 round’. 

A census can also be one of the biggest, most expensive and most complex operations a statistical office undertakes, although current trends towards increased efficiency and modernization of data collection are now easing the burden.   

This combination of importance, expense and complexity calls for detailed planning. The moment one census ends, countries are already planning the next. They depend on comprehensive guidance—to make sure they collect the data that’s needed, that they use the best methods, and that the figures they produce follow internationally-agreed definitions so that they can be compared over time and across countries. They also need guidance on how to interact with the population to maintain their trust and willingness to participate; and on how best to disseminate results in a way that can be understood and used by the full range of stakeholders. 

Why international coordination matters 

The Conference of European Statisticians (CES), UNECE’s highest statistical decision-making body, produces a detailed guide that serves as a manual for countries to conduct their census. Revised every ten years in advance of each census round, these regional recommendations have served as the main reference for countries both within and beyond the region since the 1950s. Not only does the guide advise countries on the methods and quality control procedures to follow; it also recommends ‘core’ topics, on which every country should try to produce comparable indicators, and ‘non-core’ topics, which countries may decide to include—and gives advise on how to measure each of these. 

Feeding directly into European Union legislation, much of the UNECE guidance becomes a legal requirement for EU countries, which all conduct their censuses within a short time period using harmonized definitions to make the resulting data as comparable as possible. 

UNECE does not stop at developing the guidance, but also works with countries to ensure it is followed, employing a suite of approaches: expert conferences, training workshops and on-the ground support before, during and after censuses. 

Harnessing new methods and adapting to changing needs 

While basic features that make a census a census – counting every individual and every home at the same time – haven’t changed, much else has. A range of large-scale transformations make the UNECE project to update the Recommendations more essential than ever. 

The past decade has seen a fundamental shift in the ways that census information is collected. In nearly all of the countries where information is collected by enumerators, they now use tablets or mobile devices rather than paper forms, meaning that data can be checked straight away and uploaded automatically. Many countries use Internet-based questionnaires that people complete themselves, while others bypass the direct collection of data from individuals altogether, replacing it with data gathered from population registers or other administrative sources. Task forces dedicated to enumeration methods and technology are assessing these trends and updating the guidance to account for what’s changed and what’s been learned in recent years. 

Another change that the project will study is the nature of communication and outreach before and during a census. Public perceptions of government-linked institutions, even independent ones such as national statistical offices, have altered profoundly. Countries need clearer guidance on winning and maintaining public trust in the census, so that people will willingly take part and so that the resulting data will be complete and accurate.  

A positive trend which the revised Recommendations hope to harness is the growing democratization of data—a recognition that census and other data are not only for government officials but for everybody. With this in mind, a task force dedicated to dissemination is looking at best practices in publishing census data, such as interactive maps, charts and infographics that make census findings more accessible and understandable to users with all levels of expertise. 

And then, of course, there is the impact of COVID-19. The pandemic had, and continues to have, unprecedented effects on the 2020 census round. Countries did what they could in the face of budget cuts, lockdowns and social distancing measures, legislative delays and data quality concerns. They learned on the fly, and some saw silver linings as internet response rates exceeded expectations or techniques for harnessing administrative sources were honed faster than planned. But now countries are clamouring for guidance to help them better navigate future crises. A task force on emergency preparedness and contingency planning will develop a whole new chapter of the guidance, not previously covered in its own right in the Recommendations. 

The project consists of 13 task forces, each dealing with a specific theme identified as a priority by the international community of census experts who make up the UNECE Group of Experts on Population and Housing Censuses. These 13 themes are those in which the people who design and run censuses across the UNECE region feel that circumstances have changed so much that they need new or improved recommendations: 

  • Emergency preparedness and contingency planning 

  • Quality assessment and quality management 

  • Enumeration methods 

  • Technology 

  • Population concepts and related definitions 

  • Economic characteristics 

  • Migration & mobility (national & international) 

  • Household & family characteristics 

  • Sex & gender 

  • Housing topics 

  • Geospatial information and small area statistics for censuses 

  • Dissemination of disaggregated census data 

  • Communication and outreach. 

The task forces consist of representatives from national statistical offices, international organizations and universities: more than 150 experts altogether. With strong representation from the statistical office of the European Union (Eurostat) and the UN Statistics Division in New York, the project is leading the way in what will eventually become a worldwide update of international guidance for censuses. Several countries outside the UNECE region who are members of CES, such as Mexico, Argentina, South Africa and New Zealand, use the Recommendations and are now contributing to the revision project. 

The task forces will base their revisions not only on their own expertise, but on the results of a region-wide survey to be conducted among all the national statistical offices of the UNECE region later this year. Their findings and proposals will be scrutinized by the expert community, and by the Conference of European Statisticians, resulting in an updated set of Recommendations for the 2030 round of censuses to be published in 2025. 

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE).

This Press Release has been issued by APO. The content is not monitored by the editorial team of African Business and not of the content has been checked or validated by our editorial teams, proof readers or fact checkers. The issuer is solely responsible for the content of this announcement.